My Guitars

Most I've built, some I've sold.
Click on the pic for a larger view.

If the label says "Berenger" or "de'Bert", it's one that I've built.


This guitar and the one below are my first attempts at building a body from scratch. The were built in fall 05. I used standard this one has a neck originally from a Lace brand guitar. It has Grover tuners and Seymour Duncan humbuckers. I enjoy fine cigars and working on guitars, so this incorporates elements of both. The body is poplar and it is mostly hollow to create a resonating chamber. Sounds awesome!
 


This guitar was built at the same time as the one above and with similar design- a hollow poplar body and Seymour Duncan electronics.
 

The guitar at right is one inspired by my lovely wife. She has excellent taste in color and fashion. She asked me to build a guitar with an abstract paint design that was inspired by a guitar we saw Eric Clapton playing in concert in the summer of 04. With similar color and design, I painted this guitar with automotive lacquer, then added stripes and spots with my airbrush. It has a Seymour Duncan distortion pickup in the bridge position with a push-pull pot wired to give you a series or parallel circuit. It has a hard-tail bridge and the body has 3 massive resonance chambers that were significantly hollowed out in places that are covered by the pickguard. It rocks!

Also, because I recently discovered that another guitar company with the name "Behringer". That is way too close to the name I"ve been using (that I failed to register as a trademark). As a result, I've decided to label future guitars with "de'Bert", which is a combination of her first name and mine.
 


 

The guitar at right is one of the top playing guitars I own, and probably the best I've ever built. As in the guitar above, I hollowed out the body considerably to create resonating chambers. You can't see them because I did it in a way that is concealed by the pickguard. I used Fender pickups, a MightyMite maple neck and aftermarket stuff for the rest. 

I wired the bridge tone control with a push-pull pot that can bring the bridge pickup into the circuit regardless of the position of the 5-way switch. This one jams.

 


Here's a cool guitar. I've owned/repaired/built so many strat style guitars over the past few years, I've been yearning for something different. It was a no-name copy of a Peavey EVH that was in horrible shape. It had a coat of polyurethane a mile thick with plenty of scratches and some cheesy humbuckers. Lots of sanding and buffing, along with a brand new set of Duncan Phat Cats, a Floyd Rose trem bridge and I've got a just-like-new hard rocking guitar unlike the rest.

It's got a quilted maple top and is a sapphire blue color.



The guitar at right is a Charvel strat style guitar I bought at a pawn shop in May 2004. It was black and kinda beat up, so I refinished the body using automotive lacquer.  It was supposed to be that burnt orange you see on Ford vehicles, but the black pickguard changes the tone and makes it look copper or gold depending on the light. 

This is in the top two guitars I own for sound and playability.
 



This Kramer Beretta was in horrible shape when I rescued it from a pawn shop. It was lilac blue (ewww)  with stains and chips all over. All of the hardware was rusted. It looked like crap. I stripped it down, filled in the chips and painted it with a light gold automotive lacquer. I used a Duncan Quad-rail at the bridge and Duncan Hot-Rails at the mid- and neck positions. I added a Floyd Rose tremolo. You should hear it now. WOW - this one rocks.

 



 

The guitar at right is my metallic tobacco burst Berenger PRS style guitar I built in 2004. It features Seymour Duncan pickups. The control knobs are also push-pull switches that split the pickups. This gives it the ability to sound like a variety of guitars.

 


The guitar at right is my Berenger Lace SB-3. It's constructed of Basswood, it has a maple neck with rosewood fretboard, satin gold hardware, a brass nut, and 3 Lace Sensor pickups wired like a standard American Strat. It also has a push-pull pot in the bridge tone control that allows me to activate that pickup no matter where the 5-way switch is set. I built it in June 2005. I didn't quite like the sound at first, but it's growing on me.
 



 


The guitar at right is my MIM 1998 Fender Strat. The only modification I've made is to replace the original pickguard with a white pearl pickguard.

 





 



The guitar at right  is my Berenger SRV Strat copy with a lefty neck I built in 2002. It has a  H/S/S pickup configuration with a Seymour Duncan JBJ at the bridge and Fender Tex-Mex pickups at the middle and neck positions.
The tone control knobs are also push-pull switches. One splits the bridge pickup, the other activates the bridge pickup regardless of the position of the 5-way switch.
 


The guitar at right  is updated version of my Berenger SRV Strat copy shown above. I switched bodies and modified the electronics in 2003.
It has a  H/S/H pickup configuration with a Seymour Duncan JBJ at the bridge and Fender Tex-Mex pickups at the middle and neck positions. At the neck, I have two Fender Tex-Mex pickups wired in series serving as a humbucker.
All three knobs are also push-pull switches. One splits the bridge pickup, one splits the neck pickup, and the other activates the bridge pickup regardless of the position of the 5-way switch.
 
The guitar at right began its life as a Kansas guitar. I bought it from a pawn shop in 2004 and had it laying around until the summer of 05. I painted it "autumn maple" with automotive lacquer, I installed Seymour Duncan electronics along with gold hardware. It sounds awesome, but the 24.5" scale neck has been hard for me to get used to.
 

Here's a lovely Les Paul copy I got for peanuts at a local pawn shop. One of the pickups was dead and it was absolutely beat to death with scratches and dings. A little of this, a little of that, and some new Duncan Distortion pickups, and voila; a beautiful hard rocking guitar.

 



 

The guitar at right was whimsically built in the summer of 2005. I wanted a yellow one. Soon after I built it, I had a chance to sell it, but wanted to keep the Seymour Duncans that you see here. I replaced them with after-market single-coils and converted the guitar to the form you see below.

 


 

See above:

 



The guitar at right is my black Berenger PRS style guitar I built in 2004. It uses PAF style humbuckers. The tone control is also a push-pull switch that engages an active circuit. It also has vintage Kluson style keystone tuners with green buttons.
 


The guitar at right is a lefty MIJ Squier Strat that I bought at a pawn shop.  It was in horrible shape, so I refinished it with automotive lacquer and rewired it with Fender Tex-Mex pickups. It sounds incredible!!
 


The guitar at right is a tobacco burst tele copy that I built in 2001.  Nothing fancy about this one.  I wired it like an American tele using aftermarket replacement pickups.  It has a pearly white pickguard and Grover tuners.

 

The guitar at right began its life as a Yamaha Eterna.  As I'm prone to do, I stripped it down in summer 2004, reshaped some of the wood, modified the pickguard, and rewired it. I used the original Yamaha single coils pickups because they sounded pretty good. I used a push-pull pot so I could reverse the polarity of the middle pickup and another so that I could engage the bridge pickup regardless of the position of the 5-way switch. Instead of painting it, I stained it with an Ocean Blue water based stain from Olympic.  I like how it turned out, but I would've preferred a wood with more pronounced grain.

 



 

The guitar at right began its life as an Epiphone Strat copy.  It was beat up pretty badly, so of course I refinished it with automotive lacquer, reshaped the headstock (just for the heck of it), replaced and rewired the pickguard using push-pull pots, a standard 5-way switch, and pickups from a Mexican Strat.  Sounds pretty cool. The push-pull pots allow me to engage the bridge pickup regardless of the position of the 5-way switch. The net effect is that I can have all three pickups engaged or have the bridge & neck pickups engaged.  This adds a couple of new dimensions to the standard strat sound. This project was completed in the spring of 2004.

 




The guitar at right was a design in my head for 10 years before I finally built in in 1997.  I started with a strat style guitar bought from a pawn shop in Russellville, Arkansas.  Everything changed from there. I cut the head off the neck, routed out an area on the butt end and installed the tuners there. I used a transparent orange metallic paint on top of a gold base with black edges. An interesting accident happened when I tried to clear coat the body before the paint had cured.  It began to lift in a way that looked like lizard skin.  Rather than strip and start over, I accelerated the process and continued to clear coat it until you can see the wrinkles without feeling them.  It's mostly a conversation piece because the electronics and the action suck.  I could fix it, but have moved on to higher quality projects.
 


The guitar at right was a frankenstein tele project I built from left over parts in 2001.  Has hum-hum wiring configuration, a strat style neck, and a stop-tailpiece bridge.
 

Yet another frankenstein tele project I built in 2001 from extra parts.  This one has a tremolo bridge of unknown origin.  It also has a middle pickup and is wired like a strat.
 
This one I didn't build.  In fact, I don't even have it anymore.  It was a Samick guitar with Epiphone humbuckers.  I keep the pics because I love the woodgrain.

Well, there you have it. I've built quite a few more, but didn't get pics of them all.  If you see one you like and you want to buy it, too bad.  I'm keeping them.  However, I would be glad to build you one to order.  If that's what you want to do, contact me.

 

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